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controlflow | class files and generates control

 by   toby1984 Java Version: Current License: Apache-2.0

 by   toby1984 Java Version: Current License: Apache-2.0

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kandi X-RAY | controlflow Summary

controlflow is a Java library. controlflow has no bugs, it has no vulnerabilities, it has build file available, it has a Permissive License and it has low support. You can download it from GitHub.
This project actually contains two different applications:.
Support
Support
Quality
Quality
Security
Security
License
License
Reuse
Reuse

kandi-support Support

  • controlflow has a low active ecosystem.
  • It has 17 star(s) with 4 fork(s). There are 2 watchers for this library.
  • It had no major release in the last 12 months.
  • controlflow has no issues reported. There are no pull requests.
  • It has a neutral sentiment in the developer community.
  • The latest version of controlflow is current.
controlflow Support
Best in #Java
Average in #Java
controlflow Support
Best in #Java
Average in #Java

quality kandi Quality

  • controlflow has 0 bugs and 0 code smells.
controlflow Quality
Best in #Java
Average in #Java
controlflow Quality
Best in #Java
Average in #Java

securitySecurity

  • controlflow has no vulnerabilities reported, and its dependent libraries have no vulnerabilities reported.
  • controlflow code analysis shows 0 unresolved vulnerabilities.
  • There are 0 security hotspots that need review.
controlflow Security
Best in #Java
Average in #Java
controlflow Security
Best in #Java
Average in #Java

license License

  • controlflow is licensed under the Apache-2.0 License. This license is Permissive.
  • Permissive licenses have the least restrictions, and you can use them in most projects.
controlflow License
Best in #Java
Average in #Java
controlflow License
Best in #Java
Average in #Java

buildReuse

  • controlflow releases are not available. You will need to build from source code and install.
  • Build file is available. You can build the component from source.
  • controlflow saves you 1066 person hours of effort in developing the same functionality from scratch.
  • It has 2416 lines of code, 191 functions and 22 files.
  • It has medium code complexity. Code complexity directly impacts maintainability of the code.
controlflow Reuse
Best in #Java
Average in #Java
controlflow Reuse
Best in #Java
Average in #Java
Top functions reviewed by kandi - BETA

kandi has reviewed controlflow and discovered the below as its top functions. This is intended to give you an instant insight into controlflow implemented functionality, and help decide if they suit your requirements.

  • Analyze a method node .
    • Produce a graph representation of the graph .
      • Create a class reader .
        • Validates the instrumentation .
          • Apply command line arguments .
            • Produces an instruction from a method node .
              • Returns the index of a super constructor call .
                • Rewrite class .
                  • Accounts the current execution count .
                    • Returns a string representation of this end block .

                      Get all kandi verified functions for this library.

                      Get all kandi verified functions for this library.

                      controlflow Key Features

                      A tool for generating control-flow graphs from bytecode (conveniently packages as a self-executable JAR)

                      (work-in-progress) A Java instrumentation agent that utilizes control-flow analysis to inject bytecode for counting the number of executed bytecode instructions per thread

                      Does Flutter have an equivalent command to Python's `pass` keyword?

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      void main() {
                        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
                          // Ignored
                        }
                      
                        try {
                          // Some logic
                        } on Exception {
                          // Ignored
                        }
                      
                        if (true) {
                          // Ignored
                        }
                      }
                      
                      const num = 5;
                      
                      if (num == 5) {
                          
                      }
                      

                      How to use **kwarg in Dart (like in Python)

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      const testMap = {"a": 1, "b":2};
                      
                      int testFunc(a, b){
                        return a + b;
                      }
                      
                      void main() {
                        print(Function.apply(testFunc, testMap.values.toList()));
                      }
                      
                      
                      const testMap = {#a: 1, #b:2};
                      
                      int testFunc({required int a, required int b}){
                        return a + b;
                      }
                      
                      void main() {
                        print(Function.apply(testFunc, [], testMap));
                      }
                      
                      const testMap = {"a": 1, "b":2};
                      
                      int testFunc(a, b){
                        return a + b;
                      }
                      
                      void main() {
                        print(Function.apply(testFunc, testMap.values.toList()));
                      }
                      
                      
                      const testMap = {#a: 1, #b:2};
                      
                      int testFunc({required int a, required int b}){
                        return a + b;
                      }
                      
                      void main() {
                        print(Function.apply(testFunc, [], testMap));
                      }
                      

                      How to propagate error out of a closure? (Rust, winit crate's event loop)

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      FnMut(Event<'_, T>, &EventLoopWindowTarget<T>, &mut ControlFlow)
                      
                      pub fn run<F>(self, event_handler: F) -> !
                      
                      FnMut(Event<'_, T>, &EventLoopWindowTarget<T>, &mut ControlFlow)
                      
                      pub fn run<F>(self, event_handler: F) -> !
                      

                      Iterating with for .. in on a changing collection

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      @frozen
                      public struct IndexingIterator<Elements: Collection> {
                        @usableFromInline
                        internal let _elements: Elements
                        @usableFromInline
                        internal var _position: Elements.Index
                      
                        @inlinable
                        @inline(__always)
                        /// Creates an iterator over the given collection.
                        public /// @testable
                        init(_elements: Elements) {
                          self._elements = _elements
                          self._position = _elements.startIndex
                        }
                        ...
                      }
                      
                      extension Collection where Iterator == IndexingIterator<Self> {
                        /// Returns an iterator over the elements of the collection.
                        @inlinable // trivial-implementation
                        @inline(__always)
                        public __consuming func makeIterator() -> IndexingIterator<Self> {
                          return IndexingIterator(_elements: self)
                        }
                      }
                      
                      import Foundation
                      
                      /// This is clearly fine and works as expected.
                      print("Test normal")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This is also okay. Reassigning `x` does not mutate the reference that the iterator holds.
                      print("Test reassignment")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          var x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              x = []
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This crashes. The iterator assumes that the last index it used is still valid, but after removing the objects, there are no valid indices.
                      print("Test removal")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              x.removeAllObjects()
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This also crashes. `.enumerated()` gets a reference to `x` which it expects will not be modified behind its back.
                      print("Test removal enumerated")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x.enumerated() {
                              x.removeAllObjects()
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      @frozen
                      public struct IndexingIterator<Elements: Collection> {
                        @usableFromInline
                        internal let _elements: Elements
                        @usableFromInline
                        internal var _position: Elements.Index
                      
                        @inlinable
                        @inline(__always)
                        /// Creates an iterator over the given collection.
                        public /// @testable
                        init(_elements: Elements) {
                          self._elements = _elements
                          self._position = _elements.startIndex
                        }
                        ...
                      }
                      
                      extension Collection where Iterator == IndexingIterator<Self> {
                        /// Returns an iterator over the elements of the collection.
                        @inlinable // trivial-implementation
                        @inline(__always)
                        public __consuming func makeIterator() -> IndexingIterator<Self> {
                          return IndexingIterator(_elements: self)
                        }
                      }
                      
                      import Foundation
                      
                      /// This is clearly fine and works as expected.
                      print("Test normal")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This is also okay. Reassigning `x` does not mutate the reference that the iterator holds.
                      print("Test reassignment")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          var x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              x = []
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This crashes. The iterator assumes that the last index it used is still valid, but after removing the objects, there are no valid indices.
                      print("Test removal")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              x.removeAllObjects()
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This also crashes. `.enumerated()` gets a reference to `x` which it expects will not be modified behind its back.
                      print("Test removal enumerated")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x.enumerated() {
                              x.removeAllObjects()
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      @frozen
                      public struct IndexingIterator<Elements: Collection> {
                        @usableFromInline
                        internal let _elements: Elements
                        @usableFromInline
                        internal var _position: Elements.Index
                      
                        @inlinable
                        @inline(__always)
                        /// Creates an iterator over the given collection.
                        public /// @testable
                        init(_elements: Elements) {
                          self._elements = _elements
                          self._position = _elements.startIndex
                        }
                        ...
                      }
                      
                      extension Collection where Iterator == IndexingIterator<Self> {
                        /// Returns an iterator over the elements of the collection.
                        @inlinable // trivial-implementation
                        @inline(__always)
                        public __consuming func makeIterator() -> IndexingIterator<Self> {
                          return IndexingIterator(_elements: self)
                        }
                      }
                      
                      import Foundation
                      
                      /// This is clearly fine and works as expected.
                      print("Test normal")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This is also okay. Reassigning `x` does not mutate the reference that the iterator holds.
                      print("Test reassignment")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          var x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              x = []
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This crashes. The iterator assumes that the last index it used is still valid, but after removing the objects, there are no valid indices.
                      print("Test removal")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x {
                              x.removeAllObjects()
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      
                      /// This also crashes. `.enumerated()` gets a reference to `x` which it expects will not be modified behind its back.
                      print("Test removal enumerated")
                      for _ in 0...10 {
                          let x: NSMutableArray = [0,1,2,3]
                          for i in x.enumerated() {
                              x.removeAllObjects()
                              print(i)
                          }
                      }
                      

                      How to pass multiply dictionaries as function arguments? One dict as reference and one as a copy

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      def foo(x, y):
                          print(x, y)
                      
                      foo(**{'x':1, 'y':2}) # Output: 1 2
                      foo(**{'z':1, 'y':2}) # Gives error because `foo` function doesn't have an argument named `z`
                      
                      def foo(**d):
                          print(d)
                      
                      foo(x=1, y=2) # Output: {'y': 2, 'x': 1}
                      
                      def my_function_2(data_2, **data_1):        # works fine
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                      
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                          return res
                      
                      print(my_function_2(data2, **data1))
                      print(data1, data2)
                      
                      def my_function_3(**data_1, data_2):        # doesn't work
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                      
                          return res
                      
                      def foo(x, y):
                          print(x, y)
                      
                      foo(**{'x':1, 'y':2}) # Output: 1 2
                      foo(**{'z':1, 'y':2}) # Gives error because `foo` function doesn't have an argument named `z`
                      
                      def foo(**d):
                          print(d)
                      
                      foo(x=1, y=2) # Output: {'y': 2, 'x': 1}
                      
                      def my_function_2(data_2, **data_1):        # works fine
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                      
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                          return res
                      
                      print(my_function_2(data2, **data1))
                      print(data1, data2)
                      
                      def my_function_3(**data_1, data_2):        # doesn't work
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                      
                          return res
                      
                      def foo(x, y):
                          print(x, y)
                      
                      foo(**{'x':1, 'y':2}) # Output: 1 2
                      foo(**{'z':1, 'y':2}) # Gives error because `foo` function doesn't have an argument named `z`
                      
                      def foo(**d):
                          print(d)
                      
                      foo(x=1, y=2) # Output: {'y': 2, 'x': 1}
                      
                      def my_function_2(data_2, **data_1):        # works fine
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                      
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                          return res
                      
                      print(my_function_2(data2, **data1))
                      print(data1, data2)
                      
                      def my_function_3(**data_1, data_2):        # doesn't work
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                      
                          return res
                      
                      def foo(x, y):
                          print(x, y)
                      
                      foo(**{'x':1, 'y':2}) # Output: 1 2
                      foo(**{'z':1, 'y':2}) # Gives error because `foo` function doesn't have an argument named `z`
                      
                      def foo(**d):
                          print(d)
                      
                      foo(x=1, y=2) # Output: {'y': 2, 'x': 1}
                      
                      def my_function_2(data_2, **data_1):        # works fine
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                      
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                          return res
                      
                      print(my_function_2(data2, **data1))
                      print(data1, data2)
                      
                      def my_function_3(**data_1, data_2):        # doesn't work
                          _value1 = data_1['start_value']
                          _value2 = data_1['second_value']
                      
                          res = data_2['result'] + _value1 + _value2
                          data_2['delta'] = res - data_2['result']
                          data_2['result'] = res
                      
                          return res
                      

                      Lambda in a function

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      def make_incrementor(n):
                          return lambda x: x + n
                      
                      def make_incrementor(n):
                      
                          def nolambda(x):
                              return x + n
                      
                          return nolambda
                      
                      def make_incrementor(n):
                          return lambda x: x + n
                      
                      def make_incrementor(n):
                      
                          def nolambda(x):
                              return x + n
                      
                          return nolambda
                      
                      def make_incrementor(n):
                          some_function = lambda x: x+n
                          return some_function
                      
                      def make_incrementor(n):
                          some_return_value = nolambda(n)
                          return some_return_value
                      

                      Python argument values

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                         def f(a, L=[]):
                              L.append(a)
                              return L
                          
                          print(f(1))
                          print(f(2))
                          print(f(3, L=[]))
                          print(f(4))
                      
                      print(f(3, L=[]))
                      
                      def f(a, L=[]):
                          L.append(a)
                          print(f'Your function list id: {id(L)}, now gets assigned a value of: {a}')
                          return L
                      
                      
                      print(f(1))
                      print(f(2))
                      print(f(3, L=[]))
                      print(f(4))
                      
                      def f(a, L):
                          L.append(a)
                          return L
                              
                      L = []
                      print(f(1, L))
                      print(f(2, L))
                      L = []
                      print(f(3, L))
                      print(f(4, L))
                      
                      [1]                                                                                                                                                                                
                      [1, 2]                                                                                                                                                                             
                      [3]                                                                                                                                                                                
                      [3, 4] 
                      
                      def f(a, L):
                          L.append(a)
                          return L
                              
                      L = []
                      print(f(1, L))
                      print(f(2, L))
                      L = []
                      print(f(3, L))
                      print(f(4, L))
                      
                      [1]                                                                                                                                                                                
                      [1, 2]                                                                                                                                                                             
                      [3]                                                                                                                                                                                
                      [3, 4] 
                      

                      If Statements in IDLE python3.9 Not Functioning Properly

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      if x < 0:
                          x = 0
                          print('Negative changed to zero')
                          elif x == 0:
                          print('Zero')
                      
                      if x < 0:
                          x = 0
                          print('Negative changed to zero')
                      elif x == 0:
                          print('Zero')
                      
                      if x < 0:
                          x = 0
                          print('Negative changed to zero')
                          elif x == 0:
                          print('Zero')
                      
                      if x < 0:
                          x = 0
                          print('Negative changed to zero')
                      elif x == 0:
                          print('Zero')
                      
                      >>> x = 2
                      >>> if x < 0:
                          x = 0
                          print("TRUE")
                      elif x == 0:
                          print("ELIF")
                      

                      C++| BST reference-to-node-pointer vs. a node-pointer

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      #include <iostream>
                      
                      void callByValue(int a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByValue():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      void callByRef(int &a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByRef():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      int main()
                      {
                        int b = 0;
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByValue(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByRef(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      b: 0
                      callByValue():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 0
                      callByRef():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 123
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>* &parent, const T &val) { // works
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>*  parent, const T &val) { // doesn't work, apparently generates nodes indefinitely
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                      #include <iostream>
                      
                      void callByValue(int a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByValue():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      void callByRef(int &a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByRef():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      int main()
                      {
                        int b = 0;
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByValue(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByRef(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      b: 0
                      callByValue():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 0
                      callByRef():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 123
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>* &parent, const T &val) { // works
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>*  parent, const T &val) { // doesn't work, apparently generates nodes indefinitely
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                      #include <iostream>
                      
                      void callByValue(int a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByValue():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      void callByRef(int &a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByRef():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      int main()
                      {
                        int b = 0;
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByValue(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByRef(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      b: 0
                      callByValue():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 0
                      callByRef():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 123
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>* &parent, const T &val) { // works
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>*  parent, const T &val) { // doesn't work, apparently generates nodes indefinitely
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                      #include <iostream>
                      
                      void callByValue(int a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByValue():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      void callByRef(int &a)
                      {
                        std::cout
                          << "callByRef():\n"
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n'
                          << "  a = 123;\n";
                        a = 123;
                        std::cout
                          << "  a: " << a << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      int main()
                      {
                        int b = 0;
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByValue(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                        callByRef(b);
                        std::cout << "b: " << b << '\n';
                      }
                      
                      b: 0
                      callByValue():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 0
                      callByRef():
                        a: 0
                        a = 123;
                        a: 123
                      b: 123
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>* &parent, const T &val) { // works
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      
                        void _insert(Node<T>*  parent, const T &val) { // doesn't work, apparently generates nodes indefinitely
                          if (!parent)
                            parent = new Node<T>{val};
                      

                      C++| using lambda function to check if instream is opened successfully

                      copy iconCopydownload iconDownload
                      if (fs.fail()) return false;
                      
                      [&]() { return fs.fail()); }
                      
                      if (fs.fail()) return false;
                      
                      [&]() { return fs.fail()); }
                      

                      Community Discussions

                      Trending Discussions on controlflow
                      • Does Flutter have an equivalent command to Python's `pass` keyword?
                      • How to use **kwarg in Dart (like in Python)
                      • How to propagate error out of a closure? (Rust, winit crate's event loop)
                      • Iterating with for .. in on a changing collection
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                      Trending Discussions on controlflow

                      QUESTION

                      Does Flutter have an equivalent command to Python's `pass` keyword?

                      Asked 2022-Mar-07 at 23:49

                      All I need to do with my code is if it passes the if statement, it simply passes the class and moves on to the rest of the code, but in my research, I can't exactly figure out what the command may be. Is there a way to implement Python's pass keyword in dart?

                      ANSWER

                      Answered 2022-Mar-07 at 20:49

                      There is no direct equivalent to the pass statement in Dart language. In Python, there are language restrictions that do not allow leaving empty loops, if statements and so on. However, in Dart it's completely OK to do that, you can just leave empty braces. For instance:

                      void main() {
                        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
                          // Ignored
                        }
                      
                        try {
                          // Some logic
                        } on Exception {
                          // Ignored
                        }
                      
                        if (true) {
                          // Ignored
                        }
                      }
                      

                      There are even some lint rules that check for you not to leave empty logic (you can still add a comment and not leave them empty, though): empty_statements, empty_catches and so on.

                      Source https://stackoverflow.com/questions/71386871

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                      For any new features, suggestions and bugs create an issue on GitHub. If you have any questions check and ask questions on community page Stack Overflow .

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