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whirr | A set of libraries for running cloud services | GCP library

 by   tomwhite Java Version: Current License: Apache-2.0

 by   tomwhite Java Version: Current License: Apache-2.0

kandi X-RAY | whirr Summary

whirr is a Java library typically used in Cloud, GCP applications. whirr has no bugs, it has no vulnerabilities, it has build file available, it has a Permissive License and it has low support. You can download it from GitHub.
Whirr is a set of libraries for running cloud services.
Support
Support
Quality
Quality
Security
Security
License
License
Reuse
Reuse

kandi-support Support

  • whirr has a low active ecosystem.
  • It has 15 star(s) with 3 fork(s). There are 3 watchers for this library.
  • It had no major release in the last 6 months.
  • whirr has no issues reported. There are no pull requests.
  • It has a neutral sentiment in the developer community.
  • The latest version of whirr is current.
whirr Support
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP
whirr Support
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP

quality kandi Quality

  • whirr has 0 bugs and 0 code smells.
whirr Quality
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP
whirr Quality
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP

securitySecurity

  • whirr has no vulnerabilities reported, and its dependent libraries have no vulnerabilities reported.
  • whirr code analysis shows 0 unresolved vulnerabilities.
  • There are 0 security hotspots that need review.
whirr Security
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP
whirr Security
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP

license License

  • whirr is licensed under the Apache-2.0 License. This license is Permissive.
  • Permissive licenses have the least restrictions, and you can use them in most projects.
whirr License
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP
whirr License
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP

buildReuse

  • whirr releases are not available. You will need to build from source code and install.
  • Build file is available. You can build the component from source.
  • whirr saves you 445 person hours of effort in developing the same functionality from scratch.
  • It has 1053 lines of code, 71 functions and 20 files.
  • It has low code complexity. Code complexity directly impacts maintainability of the code.
whirr Reuse
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP
whirr Reuse
Best in #GCP
Average in #GCP
Top functions reviewed by kandi - BETA

kandi has reviewed whirr and discovered the below as its top functions. This is intended to give you an instant insight into whirr implemented functionality, and help decide if they suit your requirements.

  • Launches the cluster with the given configuration .
    • Starts the server .
      • Generate a Hadoop configuration file .
        • Run URLs .
          • Builds a compute service .
            • Get the public address for the namenode .
              • Gets single node from a collection of nodes .
                • Destroys the cluster .
                  • Set the secret key file .
                    • Returns the instance template for the given roles .

                      Get all kandi verified functions for this library.

                      Get all kandi verified functions for this library.

                      whirr Key Features

                      A set of libraries for running cloud services.

                      whirr Examples and Code Snippets

                      Community Discussions

                      Trending Discussions on whirr
                      • Spring @Autowired behavior different in tests than components
                      • C UART not working all the time
                      Trending Discussions on whirr

                      QUESTION

                      Spring @Autowired behavior different in tests than components

                      Asked 2018-Jun-23 at 14:15

                      Are the rules/behaviors around @Autowired different when writing tests? It seems that with a test, you can autowire to a concrete type, but if you try the same thing inside a @Component it will fail. This is a contrived example, but it's something I ran into and am just trying to understand better.

                      Contrived example code:

                      public interface Gizmo {
                      
                        void whirr();
                      }
                      
                      @Configuration
                      public class GizmoConfiguration {
                      
                        @Bean
                        @Profile("no-dependencies")
                        public Gizmo fooGizmoBean() {
                          return new FooGizmo();
                        }
                      
                        @Bean
                        @Profile("!no-dependencies")
                        public Gizmo barGizmoBean() {
                          return new BarGizmo();
                        }
                      
                        public class FooGizmo implements Gizmo {
                          @Override
                          public void whirr() {
                          }
                        }
                      
                        public class BarGizmo implements Gizmo {
                          @Override
                          public void whirr() {
                          }
                        }
                      }
                      

                      Test that runs fine:

                      @RunWith(SpringRunner.class)
                      @SpringBootTest
                      @ActiveProfiles(Application.Profiles.NO_DEPENDENCIES)
                      public class TestClass {
                      
                        @Autowired
                        private GizmoConfiguration.FooGizmo gizmo;
                      
                        @Test
                        public void test() {
                          assertNotNull(gizmo);
                        }
                      }
                      

                      Component that causes java.lang.IllegalStateException: Failed to load ApplicationContext:

                      @Component
                      public class TestComponent {
                      
                        @Autowired
                        private GizmoConfiguration.FooGizmo gizmo;
                      }
                      

                      because of:

                      No qualifying bean of type 'GizmoConfiguration$FooGizmo' available: expected at least 1 bean which qualifies as autowire candidate. Dependency annotations: {@org.springframework.beans.factory.annotation.Autowired(required=true)}
                      

                      ANSWER

                      Answered 2018-Jun-23 at 14:15

                      Are the rules/behaviors around @Autowired different when writing tests?

                      Not exactly: the rules are actually exactly the same. The difference is in terms of timing with regard to how Spring determines if a given bean is an autowire candidate.

                      It seems that with a test, you can autowire to a concrete type, but if you try the same thing inside a @Component it will fail.

                      I understand why you would think that, since your example demonstrates that behavior, but your analysis is not exactly correct.

                      So let me explain...

                      When Spring attempts to perform autowiring for your @Component class, the only information it has about types (i.e., classes and interfaces) for beans coming from @Bean methods is the information available in an @Bean method's formal signature.

                      In your example, when Spring searches for so-called "autowire candidates" to inject into your @Component, Spring only sees a bean of type Gizmo for your fooGizmoBean() @Bean method. So that's why you see the "No qualifying bean of type 'GizmoConfiguration$FooGizmo'" error, which happens to be completely correct.

                      If you want Spring to be able to autowire your @Component using the concrete type, you will have to redefine the signature of your fooGizmoBean() @Bean method to return FooGizmo instead of Gizmo.

                      So, that's the first half of the story. The second half of the story is why the Spring TestContext Framework is able to perform autowiring by the concrete type for the test instance.

                      The reason that works is that the ApplicationContext has already been completely started (i.e., all beans have been instantiated and all @Bean methods have been invoked by the container) by the time the testing framework attempts to perform dependency injection. By that point in time, the fooGizmoBean() method has already been invoked by Spring, and Spring now knows the concrete type is actually a FooGizmo. Thus, @Autowired FooGizmo gizmo; works in the test.

                      Source https://stackoverflow.com/questions/50991110

                      Community Discussions, Code Snippets contain sources that include Stack Exchange Network

                      Vulnerabilities

                      No vulnerabilities reported

                      Install whirr

                      You can download it from GitHub.
                      You can use whirr like any standard Java library. Please include the the jar files in your classpath. You can also use any IDE and you can run and debug the whirr component as you would do with any other Java program. Best practice is to use a build tool that supports dependency management such as Maven or Gradle. For Maven installation, please refer maven.apache.org. For Gradle installation, please refer gradle.org .

                      Support

                      For any new features, suggestions and bugs create an issue on GitHub. If you have any questions check and ask questions on community page Stack Overflow .

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                      Clone
                      • https://github.com/tomwhite/whirr.git

                      • gh repo clone tomwhite/whirr

                      • git@github.com:tomwhite/whirr.git

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