kandi background
kandi background
Explore Kits
kandi background
Explore Kits
Explore all Video Game open source software, libraries, packages, source code, cloud functions and APIs.

Popular New Releases in Video Game

Proton 7.0-2

ArchiSteamFarm V5.2.5.3

Byte Buddy 1.12.8

v1.8.1

pokemon-showdown v0.11.7

Proton

Proton 7.0-2

ArchiSteamFarm

ArchiSteamFarm V5.2.5.3

byte-buddy

Byte Buddy 1.12.8

baritone

v1.8.1

pokemon-showdown

pokemon-showdown v0.11.7

Popular Libraries in Video Game

Trending New libraries in Video Game

Top Authors in Video Game

1

31 Libraries

214

2

20 Libraries

721

3

19 Libraries

278

4

17 Libraries

141

5

14 Libraries

236

6

14 Libraries

206

7

13 Libraries

717

8

13 Libraries

105

9

13 Libraries

88

10

13 Libraries

1207

1

31 Libraries

214

2

20 Libraries

721

3

19 Libraries

278

4

17 Libraries

141

5

14 Libraries

236

6

14 Libraries

206

7

13 Libraries

717

8

13 Libraries

105

9

13 Libraries

88

10

13 Libraries

1207

Trending Kits in Video Game

angry-bird1

Angry Bird

<img src="https://kandi.dev/owassets/build-your-own-angry-birds-game-banner-new.webp" alt="Build Angry Birds Game Banner" style="height:auto;max-width:100%;"/> Angry Birds python game is a Finnish action-based media franchise created by Rovio Entertainment. The game series focuses on a flock of birds referred to by the same name who try to save their eggs from the green-colored pigs. Angry Birds game written in python using Pygame and Pymunk which are open-source modules specifically intended to help you make games and other multimedia applications. Pygame can be used to load background images, sounds, and buttons, which makes the UI interactions more efficient. Pymunk is best when you need 2d physics from python which can be used for demo or simulation. Pymunk is basically built on top of the 2D physics library Chipmunk. <button class="MuiButtonBase-root MuiButton-root MuiButton-contained editexp MuiButton-containedSecondary click_collections_oneclickfiledownload " onclick="location.href='https://github.com/kandikits/angry-birds-python/raw/master/kit_installer.zip'" type="button"> ⬇️ Download 1-Click Installer </button>

kandi

1-Click Install

1110

Build 2048 Game in Node.js

<div> <img src="https://kandi.dev/owassets/2048-game-banner.png" alt="Build interactive 2048 Game" style="height:auto;max-width:100%;"/> </div> The popular 2048 Game (a fun little single-player video puzzle game where player slides numbered pieces around a board and combine like numbers to create twice as large numbers) was originally created in the terminal, but many implementations have been in other languages. The objective of this project is to implement the game in Node.js. This is a very simple 2048 game built with node JS, VSCode and HTML. This game is designed to be easy to use and modify. kandi kit provides you with a fully deployable Interactive 2048 Game in Node.js. Source code included so that you can customize it for your requirement. <button class="MuiButtonBase-root MuiButton-root MuiButton-contained editexp MuiButton-containedSecondary click_collections_oneclickfiledownload " onclick="location.href='https://github.com/kandi1clickkits/2048/raw/main/kit_installer.zip'" type="button"> ⬇️ Download 1-Click Installer </button>

kandi

1-Click Install

build-gaming-applications

Build Gaming Applications

The market size of Global Game Development Software was around USD 957.27 Million in 2020, and research suggests that it would be worth over USD 1,691.82 Million by 2026. The growing game development industry is giving rise to an increase in open-source software in the gaming domain. With the growing competition and the increasing cost of development in the fields of computer games and mobile application development, it is no wonder that open source software is gaining so much popularity. The open-source software is the one in which the source code is available for the public. Instead of paying the license fee to the developers, you can use the open-source software for free. This, in turn, means that the users can modify the system and release the updated version of the software. Open-source software also runs faster and more efficiently, making it a viable alternative for those who can't afford the proprietary alternatives. It is also less likely to cause problems when it's hosted on multiple platforms, which is something to think about if you're going to provide your users with several options for accessing your software. One of the main reasons developers use open-source while game development is that development costs are significantly reduced. In the year 2018, it was found that as many as 96% of applications have an open source component in them. When it comes to game development, where the ideas are plenty, and many people are consuming it, open-source is a boon. It saves the developer a significant amount of time, and they can focus on the idea rather than the coding part of the game. There are some other important aspects that open-source brings to the table, like the stability of the code, knowledge sharing, to name a few. The developers usually ensure that codes are updated and stable in nature so that when other developers choose to build on this, they have a stable code in place. Knowledge sharing is also a key aspect of the open-source gaming industry.

build-gaming-applications

Build Gaming Applications

The market size of Global Game Development Software was around USD 957.27 Million in 2020, and research suggests that it would be worth over USD 1,691.82 Million by 2026. The growing game development industry is giving rise to an increase in open-source software in the gaming domain. With the growing competition and the increasing cost of development in the fields of computer games and mobile application development, it is no wonder that open source software is gaining so much popularity. The open-source software is the one in which the source code is available for the public. Instead of paying the license fee to the developers, you can use the open-source software for free. This, in turn, means that the users can modify the system and release the updated version of the software. Open-source software also runs faster and more efficiently, making it a viable alternative for those who can't afford the proprietary alternatives. It is also less likely to cause problems when it's hosted on multiple platforms, which is something to think about if you're going to provide your users with several options for accessing your software. One of the main reasons developers use open-source while game development is that development costs are significantly reduced. In the year 2018, it was found that as many as 96% of applications have an open source component in them. When it comes to game development, where the ideas are plenty, and many people are consuming it, open-source is a boon. It saves the developer a significant amount of time, and they can focus on the idea rather than the coding part of the game. There are some other important aspects that open-source brings to the table, like the stability of the code, knowledge sharing, to name a few. The developers usually ensure that codes are updated and stable in nature so that when other developers choose to build on this, they have a stable code in place. Knowledge sharing is also a key aspect of the open-source gaming industry.

Trending Discussions on Video Game

    Python: implement a &quot;software-wide&quot; setting that does not change often without running an if statement in every loop
    Is there a better way to write this incredibly long regex, or perform this error check?
    Showing highlighted silhouette of mesh ONLY when it is occluded
    Extract story plots from Wikipedia
    How to return an object property from an array of objects in react
    How can you create an empty circle using exclusively CSS?
    My images are not being displayed in a row
    Deny movement in pygame when player would collide with a wall
    How to calculate rotation needed to face an object
    Updating A Json in a more efficient way

QUESTION

Python: implement a &quot;software-wide&quot; setting that does not change often without running an if statement in every loop

Asked 2022-Apr-07 at 16:09

I want Python to kind of ignore a statement that is unlikely to be called in a function that is often called.

I do not have a formal education in programming, so please excuse my lackluster ability to desribe things. I will try to explain the concept by example.

Say I am writing a video game, first-person shooter, drawing 60 frames per second. In the settings menu, the user can select whether or not to display the name of other players above their head. If they disable this, I store this value as showplayernames = False.

Then in my drawing function that outputs the graphics I have:

1def draw():
2    #code that draws the graphics on screen
3    if showplayernames:
4        #code that draws the name of players on screen
5

I call this function 60 times a second, but there is absolutely no point for checking if showplayernames is True 60 times a second. It will not change that often, in fact I could make this a kind of "constant" during play by preventing it to change. If showplayernames is False, then the third and fourth lines of the code are completely redundant, but they are executed nevertheless. The computer isn't smart enough to know it can ignore it, and there is a performance difference: reading a value and then checking if it is false takes time.

I could write two copies of the game (or at least the draw() function), one with only the first two lines when the user selects not to show names in the settings, and another without the if statement, and then run the appropriate one.

1def draw():
2    #code that draws the graphics on screen
3    if showplayernames:
4        #code that draws the name of players on screen
5def draw_with_names():
6    #code that draws the graphics on screen
7    #code that draws the name of players on screen
8
9def draw_without_names():
10    #code that draws the graphics on screen
11

Although looping through either of these 60 times a second is more efficient than running draw() ,this is obviously not the way to go. There are dozens of settings like this.

So how do software and game designers implement these kind of "software-wide" settings efficiently?

ANSWER

Answered 2022-Apr-07 at 15:38

not an game designer, but here is my voice. You could store settings inside json file next to you python, but then you need to cover reading, getting right values etc.

You could use Environment variables to store value but that would end up using still "if" in the code.

Game designers use triggers and events to get things done, and on the lowest level I would assume those things also use if's.

system-wide-settings will in the end be used with if's

You could use overwrites based on event/trigger and use "same" draw function in both times but that only complicates code, and we all know to "keep it simple".

Sorry if this is not the answer you were looking for.

Source https://stackoverflow.com/questions/71784920

Community Discussions contain sources that include Stack Exchange Network

    Python: implement a &quot;software-wide&quot; setting that does not change often without running an if statement in every loop
    Is there a better way to write this incredibly long regex, or perform this error check?
    Showing highlighted silhouette of mesh ONLY when it is occluded
    Extract story plots from Wikipedia
    How to return an object property from an array of objects in react
    How can you create an empty circle using exclusively CSS?
    My images are not being displayed in a row
    Deny movement in pygame when player would collide with a wall
    How to calculate rotation needed to face an object
    Updating A Json in a more efficient way

QUESTION

Python: implement a &quot;software-wide&quot; setting that does not change often without running an if statement in every loop

Asked 2022-Apr-07 at 16:09

I want Python to kind of ignore a statement that is unlikely to be called in a function that is often called.

I do not have a formal education in programming, so please excuse my lackluster ability to desribe things. I will try to explain the concept by example.

Say I am writing a video game, first-person shooter, drawing 60 frames per second. In the settings menu, the user can select whether or not to display the name of other players above their head. If they disable this, I store this value as showplayernames = False.

Then in my drawing function that outputs the graphics I have:

1def draw():
2    #code that draws the graphics on screen
3    if showplayernames:
4        #code that draws the name of players on screen
5

I call this function 60 times a second, but there is absolutely no point for checking if showplayernames is True 60 times a second. It will not change that often, in fact I could make this a kind of "constant" during play by preventing it to change. If showplayernames is False, then the third and fourth lines of the code are completely redundant, but they are executed nevertheless. The computer isn't smart enough to know it can ignore it, and there is a performance difference: reading a value and then checking if it is false takes time.

I could write two copies of the game (or at least the draw() function), one with only the first two lines when the user selects not to show names in the settings, and another without the if statement, and then run the appropriate one.

1def draw():
2    #code that draws the graphics on screen
3    if showplayernames:
4        #code that draws the name of players on screen
5def draw_with_names():
6    #code that draws the graphics on screen
7    #code that draws the name of players on screen
8
9def draw_without_names():
10    #code that draws the graphics on screen
11

Although looping through either of these 60 times a second is more efficient than running draw() ,this is obviously not the way to go. There are dozens of settings like this.

So how do software and game designers implement these kind of "software-wide" settings efficiently?

ANSWER

Answered 2022-Apr-07 at 15:38

not an game designer, but here is my voice. You could store settings inside json file next to you python, but then you need to cover reading, getting right values etc.

You could use Environment variables to store value but that would end up using still "if" in the code.

Game designers use triggers and events to get things done, and on the lowest level I would assume those things also use if's.

system-wide-settings will in the end be used with if's

You could use overwrites based on event/trigger and use "same" draw function in both times but that only complicates code, and we all know to "keep it simple".

Sorry if this is not the answer you were looking for.

Source https://stackoverflow.com/questions/71784920