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pride | Manages a pride of Gradle modules | Plugin library

 by   prezi Java Version: 0.11 License: Non-SPDX

 by   prezi Java Version: 0.11 License: Non-SPDX

kandi X-RAY | pride Summary

pride is a Java library typically used in Plugin, Gradle applications. pride has no bugs, it has no vulnerabilities, it has build file available and it has low support. However pride has a Non-SPDX License. You can download it from GitHub, Maven.
Manages a pride of Gradle modules
Support
Support
Quality
Quality
Security
Security
License
License
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Reuse

kandi-support Support

  • pride has a low active ecosystem.
  • It has 68 star(s) with 11 fork(s). There are 167 watchers for this library.
  • It had no major release in the last 12 months.
  • There are 12 open issues and 123 have been closed. On average issues are closed in 13 days. There are 3 open pull requests and 0 closed requests.
  • It has a neutral sentiment in the developer community.
  • The latest version of pride is 0.11
pride Support
Best in #Plugin
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pride Support
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quality kandi Quality

  • pride has 0 bugs and 0 code smells.
pride Quality
Best in #Plugin
Average in #Plugin
pride Quality
Best in #Plugin
Average in #Plugin

securitySecurity

  • pride has no vulnerabilities reported, and its dependent libraries have no vulnerabilities reported.
  • pride code analysis shows 0 unresolved vulnerabilities.
  • There are 0 security hotspots that need review.
pride Security
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pride Security
Best in #Plugin
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license License

  • pride has a Non-SPDX License.
  • Non-SPDX licenses can be open source with a non SPDX compliant license, or non open source licenses, and you need to review them closely before use.
pride License
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pride License
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buildReuse

  • pride releases are available to install and integrate.
  • Deployable package is available in Maven.
  • Build file is available. You can build the component from source.
  • Installation instructions, examples and code snippets are available.
  • It has 3999 lines of code, 359 functions and 83 files.
  • It has medium code complexity. Code complexity directly impacts maintainability of the code.
pride Reuse
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pride Reuse
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Top functions reviewed by kandi - BETA

kandi has reviewed pride and discovered the below as its top functions. This is intended to give you an instant insight into pride implemented functionality, and help decide if they suit your requirements.

  • Adds a collection of modules to the repository .
    • Execute a set of command lines .
      • Runs the project definition .
        • Check the versions of the dependencies .
          • Performs initialization of the gradle project .
            • Get repository url .
              • Retrieves the root project model .
                • Tries to checkout a module in the given directory .
                  • Loads module data from the configuration file .
                    • Creates the init action .

                      Get all kandi verified functions for this library.

                      Get all kandi verified functions for this library.

                      pride Key Features

                      Manages a pride of Gradle modules

                      pride Examples and Code Snippets

                      Community Discussions

                      Trending Discussions on pride
                      • How to implement zero-overhead Inversion of Control
                      • How to remove strings that contain at least an uppercase letter in them from an ArrayList<String>?
                      • how to print the no of letters including space in each element in list in python
                      • How to check next element in a for loop based off of a condition?
                      • Trying to match on multiple characters
                      • How to align these nested bootstrap cards?
                      • While loop data not appending to list outside of while loop
                      • IN MongoDB Query
                      • Azure API App Throwing Request Size constraints Errors
                      • Create a menu inside a Class
                      Trending Discussions on pride

                      QUESTION

                      How to implement zero-overhead Inversion of Control

                      Asked 2022-Mar-29 at 08:05

                      Almost every OOP programmer has been exposed to the concept of Inversion of control. In C++, we can implement that principle with dynamic callbacks (i.e. functors such as lambdas and function pointers). But if we know at compile time what procedure we are to inject into the driver, theoretically I believe that there is a way to eliminate the overhead of function passing and invoking by composing the callbacks and the driver/signal/what-so-ever function into an "unrolled procedure". Here is an example.

                      For a GUI program, we have logic on window 1) setup, 2) loop, and 3) termination. We can inject code 1) after window setup, 2) in each render loop, 3) and before termination. A procedural approach is to write in this manner:

                      // Snippet 1:
                      init_window();
                      init_input_handler();
                      init_canvas();
                      init_socket();
                      while (!window_should_close()) {
                        update_window();
                        handle_input();
                        draw_on_canvas();
                        send_through_socket();
                      }
                      drop_input_handler();
                      drop_canvas();
                      drop_socket();
                      terminate_window();
                      

                      OOP programmers pride ourselves in decoupling and proper abstraction. Instead, we write this:

                      // Snippet 2:
                      init_window();
                      on_window_init_signal.send();
                      while (!window_should_close()) {
                        update_window();
                        on_render_signal.send();
                      }
                      on_exit_signal.send();
                      terminate_window();
                      

                      But this brings an unwanted overhead as said above. My question is: How can we utilize the C++ metaprogramming mechanisms to achieve zero-overhead inversion of control so that code in a similar form of snippet 2 can be transformed into snippet 1 statically (i.e. at compile time)?

                      EDIT: I can think of loop optimizations widely found in optimizers. Maybe this is a generalized version of that issue.

                      ANSWER

                      Answered 2022-Mar-29 at 08:05

                      "Zero Overhead" & "But if we know at compile time what procedure we are to inject into the driver, " is possible.

                      You can use a template class to pass the functions to call like that:

                      struct SomeInjects
                      {
                          static void AtInit() { std::cout << "AtInit from SomeInjects" << std::endl; }
                          static void AtHandleInput() { std::cout << "AtHandleInput from SomeInjects" << std::endl; }
                          static void AtDraw() { std::cout << "AtDraw from SomeInjects" << std::endl; }
                      };
                      
                      struct OtherInject
                      {
                          static void AtInit() { std::cout << "AtInit from OtherInject" << std::endl; }
                          static void AtHandleInput() { std::cout << "AtHandleInput from OtherInject" << std::endl; }
                          static void AtDraw() { std::cout << "AtDraw from OtherInject" << std::endl; }
                      };
                      
                      template < typename Mixin >
                      struct Win
                      {
                          void Init()
                          {    
                              Mixin::AtInit();
                          }    
                      
                          void HandleInput()
                          {    
                              Mixin::AtHandleInput();
                          }    
                      
                          void Draw()
                          {    
                              Mixin::AtDraw();
                          }    
                      };
                      
                      int main()
                      {
                          Win<SomeInjects> wsi; 
                          wsi.Init();
                          wsi.HandleInput();
                          wsi.Draw();
                      
                          Win<OtherInject> wso;
                          wso.Init();
                          wso.HandleInput();
                          wso.Draw();
                      }
                      

                      But this has the drawback, that it needs static functions.

                      More elaborated try:

                      struct SomeInjects
                      {
                          void AtInit() { std::cout << "AtInit from SomeInjects" << std::endl; }
                          void AtHandleInput() { std::cout << "AtHandleInput from SomeInjects" << std::endl; }
                          void AtDraw() { std::cout << "AtDraw from SomeInjects" << std::endl; }
                      };
                      
                      struct OtherInject
                      {
                          void AtInit() { std::cout << "AtInit from OtherInject" << std::endl; }
                          void AtHandleInput() { std::cout << "AtHandleInput from OtherInject" << std::endl; }
                          void AtDraw() { std::cout << "AtDraw from OtherInject" << std::endl; }
                      };
                      
                      template < typename Mixin >
                      struct Win: Mixin
                      {
                          void Init()
                          {    
                              this->AtInit();
                          }    
                      
                          void HandleInput()
                          {    
                              this->AtHandleInput();
                          }    
                      
                          void Draw()
                          {    
                              this->AtDraw();
                          }    
                      };
                      
                      int main()
                      {
                          Win<SomeInjects> wsi; 
                          wsi.Init();
                          wsi.HandleInput();
                          wsi.Draw();
                      
                          Win<OtherInject> wso; 
                          wso.Init();
                          wso.HandleInput();
                          wso.Draw();
                      }
                      

                      The last technique is called Mixin.

                      If your compiler inlines all and everything depends on many things. But typically all calls are inlined if the called functions are not really to big.

                      But if you need any runtime changeable callbacks, you have to use some kind of callable representation. That can be function pointers or things like std::function. The last generates more or less always some minor overhead.

                      But remember: A simple dereferenced pointer is typically not the speed problem at all. More important is, that in such cases constants can not be propagated, the code can't be inlined and as a result an overall optimization is not longer possible. But if runtime flexibility is needed, it will have some cost. As always: Measure before optimize!

                      Source https://stackoverflow.com/questions/71647356

                      Community Discussions, Code Snippets contain sources that include Stack Exchange Network

                      Vulnerabilities

                      No vulnerabilities reported

                      Install pride

                      If you are installing Pride for the first time, it’s recommended to set the base URL for all your Git repositories, for example:. So when you execute pride add some-module, it will clone git@github.com:prezi/some-module.

                      Support

                      Pull requests are more than welcome. For discussions, please head over to the [mailing list](https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/pride-dev).

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                      Clone
                      • https://github.com/prezi/pride.git

                      • gh repo clone prezi/pride

                      • git@github.com:prezi/pride.git

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